Category Archives: Hallmark Discussion

2020 Star Trek Storytellers Hanging Around

Kevin Dilmore has announced that the 2020 Hallmark Star Trek Storyteller ornaments will be available until the entire series has been produced.  This means Kirk, Sulu, Uhura and the Enterprise tree topper will be available to purchase in 2021 and 2022.

We still have Spock, McCoy, Scotty and Chekov to be released over the next two years. Although there hasn’t been any official announcement, it is likely we will see Spock and Scotty in 2021 and McCoy and Chekov in the final year.

Whichever ornaments are released next year they will be available in both 2021 and 2022.  There is still no word if the 2021-2022 Star Trek releases will be exclusively Storytellers or if we will see other Star Trek ornaments. With all the new Star Trek series that have and will be coming out it is hard to imagine we won’t see something from Picard or Lower Decks.

Positively Trek: Kevin Dilmore on 2020 Ornaments

CE4E2835-D6C9-4EF2-9B70-B95CDF841684In this week’s Positively Trek, Dan and Bruce are joined by veteran Star Trek authors Dayton Ward and Kevin Dilmore. We talk about the Lower Decks trailer, as well as an in-depth discussion about that dreaded C-word when it comes to Star Trek: Canon! Dayton’s role as the “Keeper of Canon” for CBS’s Star Trek projects gives him a unique perspective on this age-old question that continues to rear its ugly head within the fandom.

We also talk with Kevin Dilmore about this year’s truly unique and groundbreaking Star Trek Hallmark Keepsake Ornaments!

Ornament discussion begins at 46:13.

Hallmark’s Complete 30-Year Line of Enterprise Ornaments

Star Trek ships by the name of Enterprise have been represented by Hallmark 23 times over the past thirty years. Here is a complete list of every Enterprise Hallmark ornament released and those Enterprises that have been missed.

Enterprise NX-01 (2002)
Lynn Norton: “It’s a very cool ship. In my mind, it typified what a starship should look like even more so than the original Enterprise. I always had a bit of a problem with a primary hull and this secondary hull sticking out from it and then your engines are way in the air on these pylons. I always imagine that there is something happening in these engines that would harm the crew, so you want them as far away from the crew and even the engineering section as possible. The NX-01 was integrated. It is sculpturally more pleasing to me.”

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 *Pilot Episode-50th Anniversary* (2016)
Box text: The very first Starfleet vessel to bear the name U.S.S. Enterprise is rendered here to celebrate the 50th anniversary of its iconic journey into the Final Frontier. Based on the series’ pilot episode, this gold-hued Enterprise ornament lets you hear Captain Kirk’s monologue and the iconic music from the opening credits of the Star Trek TV series!

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 *Pilot Episode-50th Anniversary* (2016)
Box text: U.S.S. Enterprise – Featuring dialogue and music directly from the original “Star Trek” TV Series, this Keepsake Ornament depicts the iconic starship as originally built and painted for special-effects filming. This is a repaint of a 2016 Keepsake Ornament celebrating Star Trek’s 50th anniversary.  Limited quantity of 3,450.

Lynn Norton: “This is the one that I really went out of my way to make as accurate as possible. I based it on the original shooting model with its larger bridge dome, larger deflector dish and nacelle features as a tribute to the series’ 50th anniversary. Assuming it’s able to maintain all of its details in final production, it’s more accurate than anything I’ve done before.”

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 (1991)
Box text: This unique ornament, with its bright blinking lights, commemorates the 25th anniversary of STAR TREK and celebrates the holiday season.

Lynn Norton: ”From the beginning, Star Trek imagined that we had overcome the problem of a ship having enough energy not only to propel yourself but to give yourself a comfortable living environment. As a design, it captured our excitement from the notion of flying saucer and the way we had come to imagine what a deep-space vehicle might look like. When you start thinking of the physics of propelling an object through space, it doesn’t have to look aerodynamic. It can be purely functional. The fact that it was a flying saucer is one of the things that captured my imagination right away. All space movies are really submarine movies. The Enterprise reflects all the elements of a submarine crew’s experience — living in close quarters in a hostile environment with nothing but a thin metal skin between them and oblivion — and put it in space seamlessly. At Hallmark, Don Palmiter, Dill Rhodus and I brought fine scale model-making to the ornament business. We really had to convince our art directors we could go beyond cute and traditional and make really believable small models to be used as ornaments. Our commitment to high quality fit right into the Hallmark ideals for product. Now, I also had to fight the initial idea of having a string of garland hanging along the edge of the primary hull, and Santa Claus popping out of the bridge — true story! I wanted to make it as accurate as possible. I’m very aware of the changes to that first ornament. Because it had big, thick circuitry inside for lights, the ornament had heat dissipation problems. We had to build a big cavity into it so the circuit board would not melt the plastic. Also, the ornament had to fit into a ‘printer’s box’ store display with a limited space, and I had to shorten the nacelles for it to fit. I beat that poor design nearly to death, but it got us started and it was very popular with fans of Star Trek and of Keepsake Ornaments. When we reissued the ornament in 1996 for the show’s 30th anniversary, we used the same design.”

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 *Ships of Star Trek Minis* (1995)
Box text: This set of three miniature Hallmark ornaments feature smaller versions of previoulsy released Hallmark keepsake ornaments – The Starship Enterprise from the original tv series, U.S.S. Enterprise 1701-D, and the Klingon Bird of Prey from Star Trek: The Next Generation. These miniature ornaments can hang independently, or be hung from the 2001 Space Station Deep Space Nine Hallmark ornament. When combined with the 2001 Starfleet Legends, you can create your own miniature Star Trek fleet.


U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 *30th Anniversary* (1996)

Box text: This 1996 Hallmark Keepsake Ornament set features the voice of Captain James T. Kirk, the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC 1701, and the shuttlecraft Galileo NCC 1701/7. This Star Trek Hallmark Ornament features sound: A starfleet communicator as it is opened, as used by Enterprise crew members on the hit television show, followed by the voice of William Shatner as Captain James T. Kirk, and his famous opening for the show: “Space… the Final Frontier. These are the voyages of the Starship Enterprise. Its five-year mission: To explore strange new worlds… to seek out new life and new civilizations… to boldly go where no man has gone before…”.

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 *Blown Glass* (1999)

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 *Stamp* (1999)
Box text:  Beginnning in 1998, the United States Postal Service issued its largest-ever series of commemoritive postage stamps.  By the time the program is completed in 2000. A total of 150 designs will have been released, providing a decade-by-decade look at significant personalities and events of the 20th Century. Authentic reproductions of six noteworthy designs are featured in the 1999 Keepsake Ornament line.  Each one is showcased in its own unique frame that enhances  the artwork and the enjoyment of the familiar images.  Ideal for holiday or year-round decorating, or to display with a collection of Celebrate the Century commemorative stamps, these ornaments will be cherished well into the next century.

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 *40th Anniversary* (2006)
Box text: A flagship of Starfleet, U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 embarked on its historic five-year mission in 2264. Commanded by Captain James T. Kirk, the STARSHIP ENTERPRISE transported us to the final frontier for unparalleled adventure. During their exploration, the ship and crew introduced us to life on new planets and unimaginable technologies. As an ambassador for Earth and the rest of the United Federation of Planets, the ENTERPRISE gave us an inspiring vision of the future. Celebrate the 40th anniversary of the original Star Trek television series with this authentic representation of the first ship “to boldly go where no man has gone before.” To see this ornament come to life, place it on the included display stand. Press the button on the back of the stand to hear the theme song from the original TV series and see various lights on the ship illuminated. The lights will automatically turn off after 20 seconds.

Lynn Norton: “Look at the original Enterprise and you see basic geometric shapes. Almost everything on that original ship, I can execute on my miniature lathe and miniature mill. As we start moving through more complex designs, there became fewer and fewer things I could make on the lathe. They became more oval-shaped, there were detailed ridges and recesses that didn’t appear that much on the original Enterprise except for the interior of the nacelles. They added details to the models as time went on. This was my more accurate sculpting of the original ship design. It felt redemptive in that I was able to get it closer to scale. There is a difference in end product versus what I sculpted because of the process to build a master pattern that is used to cut the molds. You end up with process shrinkage and distortion, and in 2006, that didn’t make me happy. The saucer got too thin. They weren’t able to keep the nacelles properly aligned to the center axis. It’s not just us. That’s been a problem for every manufacturer who makes this ship into a consumer product. I just wanted to do something a little different than I had done before.”

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 (2018)
Box text: The flagship of Starfleet, U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 embarked on its historic five-year mission under Captain James T. Kirk in 2265. The ship and crew introduced Star Trek™ viewers to the final frontier with unparalleled adventure, life on new worlds and unimaginable technologies. An homage to the classic series and its legacy of more than 50 years, this premium Christmas tree ornament is rendered in metal, an essential addition to any Star Trek™ collection.


U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 *Tree Topper* (2020)
Promotional info: The Storyteller Enterprise Tree Topper ornament tells a different story depending on the combination of other ornaments in the series connected via a Keepsakes power cord.  These Storyteller ornaments will be based upon characters from the Star Trek episode “Mirror, Mirror”.  Look for Mirror Sulu, Mirror Kirk and Mirror Uhura in 2020 and more Storytellers coming in 2021 and 2022.

I.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 *Mirror Universe* (2019)
Box text: When a transporter malfunction during an ion storm flung Captain James T. Kirk and three of his officers into another dimension, they found themselves on board the I.S.S. Enterprise, a Terran Empire battle cruise nearly identical in configuration to the ship they called home.  This “mirror universe” Imperial Star Ship Enterprise featured dagger-and-Earth symbols as decór, armed soldiers in every corridor, and torture chambers called agony booths to keep crew members compliant with command.

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 2.0 *Kelvin Timeline* (2010)
Box text: In its maiden voyage in 2009’s Star Trek, the U.S.S. Enterprise responds to a distress call from the planet Vulcan.  Arriving to find the rest of the rescue fleet destroyed by Romulans, the Enterprise tries unsuccessfully to save the planet.  With Captain Christopher Pike held prisoner by the enemy and First Officer Spock emotionally compromised, the crew soon find themselves under the command of the brash young James T. Kirk,  The warp-speed action that follows is a baptism by fire for the Enterprise’s fledgling crew and an exciting Star Trek introduction to a new generation of fans.

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 *Refit* (2019)
Box text: Carrying its crew on all-new voyages, the refit version of the U.S.S. Enterprise launched to face the cosmic entity known as V’Ger. Boasting updates to its warp nacelles and overall design, this Enterprise was introduced in 1979’s “Star Trek: The Motion Picture.”

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-A (2005)
Box text: Under the command of Captain James T. Kirk the starship U.S.S. ENTERPRISE NCC-1701-A was pressed into service to replace its namesake that was destroyed on a previous mission.  Nearly identical to its predecessor, the ENTERPRISE-A was prematurely launched to intervene in a hostage situation on planet NIMBUS III, forcing the crew to complete vital systems while en route.

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-C (2015)
Box text: The fourth Starfleet vessel to bear the name U.S.S. Enterprise, the NCC-1701-C played a crucial role in establishing peace between the United Federation of Planets and the rival Klingon Empire. In the classic Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Yesterday’s Enterprise” (1990), this Ambassador-class starship entered a temporal rift, providing a view of an alternate reality that transformed Captain Jean-Luc Picard and his crew into bitter and weary warriors in a decades-long conflict between the two space-traveling powers.

Lynn Norton: “I had this ship on my short list for years. The ornament has got a kick-ass lighting effect. I know there was some conversation among fans as to our releasing it with a pristine look rather than having some battle damage as depicted in the (TNG) episode “Yesterday’s Enterprise.” My vote was to make it pristine. While I’m thrilled that Star Trek fans like our products, we have to keep the Hallmark shopper in mind as our primary consumer. When you put something in the store that appears battle-damaged, to them, it looks dirty. They don’t know the backstory and in many cases they don’t care as they likely are buying these as a gift for someone who is a fan. That fan will appreciate the detail and pore over it, but at the point of purchase, the buyer needs to be attracted to it. In my mind, I like reserving the battle-damage look for reissues or as event exclusives.”

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-C *Battle Damaged* (2017)
Promotional info: U.S.S. Enterprise™ NCC-1701-C, a Keepsake Ornament inspired by the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Yesterday’s Enterprise,” depicts the iconic starship with a battle-damage paint scheme as it appeared on screen.  This repaint of a 2015 Keepsake Ornament has a total production run of 3,325 and sales will be limited to 225 per day.


U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-D (1993)

Box text: The U.S.S. Enterprise from the TV program STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION, voyages to your galaxy to light up your tree.  This unique starship, with its blinking and glowing lights, will fill your holiday with Keepsake Magic!

Lynn Norton: “At the time, Paramount would send me original blueprints and photos of the filming model as it was being constructed. I had access to detail that wasn’t readily apparent on our TV sets in those days, and I was able to explore and appreciate the design. I always imagined how I wanted to be part of the teams that built those studio models. It was thrilling for me to see the materials they were sending me. What appealed to me most was the level of detail visible on the hull and nacelles. The original was very simplistic in nature, and I had no problem with that. On the D, everything was busy. The Aztec patterns on the hull caused us some concern. What people are imagining on these end products is an extension of what happens in real life. Much of the hull plating is prefabricated and painted at the factory and there are little bits of variation in the paint lots, so there is a small difference in tone for each plate. Also, as plates go over curves, reflectivity changes. It happens on metal aircraft, so we’re familiar with seeing it. Even if you have no paint, the fact that metal when formed will change its lighting characteristics just slightly enough that it ends up with a patchwork look. But on an ornament, capturing that look can add literally hundreds of decoration steps, whether spray masks or pad printing or however you choose to do it. We chose not to.”

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-D *Ships of Star Trek Minis* (1995)
This set of three miniature Hallmark ornaments feature smaller versions of previoulsy released Hallmark keepsake ornaments – The Starship Enterprise from the original tv series, U.S.S. Enterprise 1701-D, and the Klingon Bird of Prey from Star Trek: The Next Generation. These miniature ornaments can hang independently, or be hung from the 2001 Space Station Deep Space Nine Hallmark ornament. When combined with the 2001 Starfleet Legends, you can create your own miniature Star Trek fleet.


U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-D (2012)

Box text: For twenty-five years, science fiction fans have enjoyed watching the 24th century adventures of Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew of the USS Enterprise NCC-1701-D. This anniversary-edition Keepsake Ornament comes complete with a display base, so you can relive the excitement felt at hearing the opening music year after year. Attach ship to base and press button to hear Captain Picard’s monologue and music from the opening credits of STAR TREK: The Next Generation.

Lynn Norton: “Since I previously made adjustments to my original 1993 sculpture for the 2007 issue, I utilized the revised sculpture from 2007 as a basis for the 2012 anniversary edition. I removed all of the additions and restored the D to its original configuration. We decided to place the ornament on a display base so it could have sound in addition to lights. With that in mind, the control circuitry, batteries and speaker would all be housed in a base that is permanently attached, unlike the detachable bases on previous ornaments.”

Future U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-D *Refit* (2007)
Box text: A famous version of the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-D appears in a space-time paradox where three separate time periods have collided.  Commanded by Admiral William T. Riker, the refitted Enterprise and officers are reunited with the former captain, Jean-Luc Picard.  Mankind’s existence is in the balance as the ships and crew from different eras join to battle the enemies of the Federation and the forces that caused their convergence.  Press the button on the bottom of the ornament to see the ship’s deflector dish and engines illuminate.

Lynn Norton: “The triple-nacelle ornament from (the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode) ‘All Good Things…’ was based on my original sculpture from 1993. Hallmark allows artists to retain original artwork for our portfolios, although the sculptures are often badly damaged from the process of molding and prototyping. The licensor supplied me with a number of photographs of the filming model as it was being refitted with additional components. In addition to adding the third nacelle and battle-bridge modifications, I made numerous proportional adjustments and refinements to the sculpture. I knew the 2007 ornament would be battery powered and wouldn’t have to pass the rigorous UL tests for tapping electricity from a light string. I still had to make provisions for LED placements, wire paths and battery installation, which included an access door on the underside of the saucer.”


U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-E (1998)

Box text: A unique ornament – featuring the U.S.S. Enterprise-E NCC-1701-E from Star Trek: First Contact.  Under the command of Captain Jean-Luc Picard, the crew of the 24th-century Starship Enterprise is traveling back in time to the 21st century.  There, they’ll confront the biggest threat to the Star Trek universe – the Borg, whose actions would alter history and turn Earth into a Borg colony.  The U.S.S. Enterprise seen in the movie is the sixth starship in the history of the Federation to carry the proud name EnterpriseThe front deflector shield as well as both warp engines and the impulse engines are lighted.

Lynn Norton: “I adore the E. They did things to it to make it look more aerodynamic than it needed to be, but those choices gave it more style—a more swept-back, speedy appearance like a modern race car. There were a lot of products out there being developed right along side the model during (Star Trek: First Contact’s) production. I was getting the same photos from the studio as everyone else was, and originally the E had a blue-glowing deflector array. We went to see the movie and there’s that whole scene set on the deflector array and they’re out there walking around on it—and it’s amber! I was like ‘What the?’ But we were able to make that change while the ornament was in development at the toolmaker. Because it didn’t go to stores right away, our ornament was one of the few screen-accurate products on the market at the time.”

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-E *Starfleet Legends Minis* (2001)
Box text: Featuring: 3 legendary miniature star trek ships (Enterprise E, Voyager, and Defiant) that connect with the 2001 Deep Space 9 Space Station Hallmark Ornament (not included)

And now to those ships that have been missed…

U.S.S. Enterprise XCV 330
Registry: USS Enterprise (XCV 330)
Class: Declaration
Service: circa 2130s
Captain: Unknown

This USS Enterprise (XCV 330) appears in Star Trek: The Motion Picture(1979) among a series of illustrations depicting ships named Enterprise. It also appears as a model in Star Trek Into Darkness (2013), together with models of the Wright Flyer, a V-2 rocket, a Bell X-1, a Vostok-3KA capsule, a Space Shuttle orbiter, and some Star Trek universe starships. The 1979 Star Trek Spaceflight Chronology describes this “first interstellar liner” as a Declaration-class ship launched in 2123. Its length is given as 300 metres (980 ft), and it has a capacity of 100 crew and 850 passengers. The Star Trek Maps by New Eye Photography Editors, also published in 1979, listed this ship as a fusion drive probe that was Earth’s first attempt to explore another star system. The Making of Star Trek: The Motion Picture, published in 1980, describes the ship as “the very first starship U.S.S. Enterprise“.[2] A painting of this ship hangs on the wall of Earth’s 602 Club in flashbacks that appeared in the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “First Flight” (2003).

Will we ever see this in ornament form?
Never.

I.S.S. Enterprise NX-01
Registry: ISS Enterprise (NX-01)
Class: NX
Service: 2150s
Captains: Maximilian Forrest (Vaughn Armstrong), Jonathan Archer (Scott Bakula)
The Star Trek: Enterprise episode “In a Mirror, Darkly” features a Mirror Universe version of NX-01 Enterprise. This ship is equipped with a cloaking device, deflector shields, a tractor beam, a prototype agony booth, and different exterior markings. It is commanded by Captain Maximilian Forrest, although for a brief time his first officer, Commander Jonathan Archer, takes command following a mutiny. This Enterprise is destroyed by the Tholians.

Will we ever see this in ornament form?
We have only seen the U.S.S. NX-01 in metal form so getting any version of the I.S.S. NX-01 is very remote.

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701 *Discovery*
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Registry:
USS Enterprise (NCC-1701)
Class: ‘Constitution
Captains: Christopher Pike
Enterprise first appears at the end of Star Trek: Discovery’s first season and throughout the second season (2256).

Will we ever see this in ornament form?
Very likely and hopefully with a Pike spinoff series it will be sooner rather than later.

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-A *Kelvin Timeline*

Registry: USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-A)
Class: ‘Constitution
Service: 2263–ongoing
Captains: James T. Kirk (Chris Pine)
Enterprise-A first appears at the end of Star Trek Beyond after the destruction of the original Enterprise when the crew resume their five-year mission.

Will we ever see this in ornament form?
It seems like this could be a good excuse to trot out another Enterprise and the general public wouldn’t look close enough to realize where along the Star Trek canon it was representing. If the movies dip back into the Kelvin universe this would be a sure bet.

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-B
Registry: USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-B)
Class: Excelsior-class refit
Service: 2293–2329 (36 years)
Captains: John Harriman (Alan Ruck)
The Enterprise-B was launched at the beginning of the film Star Trek Generations (1994). During the ship’s maiden voyage, the crew encountered an energy ribbon known as the Nexus, where James T. Kirk was officially declared missing and presumed dead. The design of the Enterprise-B is nearly identical to that of the USS Excelsior, which first appeared in the 1984 film Star Trek III: The Search For Spock. Differences between the Enterprise and the Excelsior include: flarings on the outside of the secondary hull, additional and larger impulse engines, and slight differences in the nacelles and bridge modules. Non-canon information concerning the Enterprise-B includes several licensed Star Trek novels in which Demora Sulu (Jacqueline Kim) followed Harriman as captain, as well as licensed guides such as the Haynes Enterprise Manual, in which a list of the ship’s captains includes Demora Sulu, William George, and Thomas Johnson Jr.

Will we ever see this in ornament form?
We should have already seen it! C’mon Hallmark!

U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701-J
Registry: USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-J)
Class: Universe
Service: 26th century
Captain(s): Dax
The “Azati Prime” episode of involves time travel and features a scene in which Enterprise-J appears. Enterprise-J operates in a possible timeline during the 26th century. In this timeline, Enterprise-J participated in the Battle of Procyon V, a climactic battle in which the Federation successfully drove the invasive trans-dimensional beings known as the Sphere Builders back into their own realm. The ship’s crew included a descendant of the Xindi scientist Degra.

Will we ever see this in ornament form?
Slight, slight, slight chance. Who am I kidding? No.

Hallmark Keepsake Ornaments, the Inside Stories From the Artists Who Create Them

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Hallmark Keepsake Ornaments, the Inside Stories From the Artists Who Create Them

This book tells the stories of Keepsake artists, their families, hobbies and the mystery of creativity itself…ordinary stories that reveal the extraordinary talent that’s made Keepsake the innovative leader in christmas ornaments for so many years.

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Star Trek: The Complete Unauthorized History

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Star Trek: The Complete Unauthorized History

An unauthorized history of Star Trek TV shows and films, celebrating its enduring popularity and devoted fans.

Star Trek: The Complete Unauthorized History is a loving and candid review of the fifty-year franchise, a story as full of plot twists as its hundreds of episodes and films. Greenberger, author of over a dozen Star Trek novels and short stories, tells this fascinating tale as only an expert and longtime fan could. He examines the behind-the-scenes saga–from the struggles of Star Trek’s enthusiastic creator, Gene Roddenberry, to realize his vision on the small screen, to the franchise’s latest cinematic reinvention from J. J. Abrams–as well as the devoted fans who support its continued growth.

Featuring sidebars by such Star Trek authorities as Michael and Denise Okuda, as well as contributions from well-known fans, including astronauts Thomas D. Jones and Mario Runco Jr., Star Trek: The Complete Unauthorized History captures the long and bumpy road to Star Trek becoming an international, groundbreaking phenomenon. Greenberger explores the many ways in which Star Trek has earned its enduring place in pop culture, evidenced by myriad comic books, audio dramas, software, board games, short stories, novels, Saturday Night Live sketches, elaborate fan productions, and well-known catch phrases. More than two hundred photographs illustrate the book.

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Star Trek Tree Toppers

For year’s Star Trek fans have been adorning their Christmas tree’s summit with custom made insignia toppers, repurposed Star Trek items and licensed but off-brand pieces.

When Hallmark’s Star Trek Enterprise tree topper premieres next July we will finally have an “official” tree topper that has been 30 years in the making.

The Enterprise tree topper will also be in the Storytellers series and will communicate with other ornaments to retell the classic  Mirror, Mirror episode.

The starship topper comes with a $119.95 price tag but unlike a traditional ornament there is only room for one tree topper on your Christmas tree so the 2020 release is likely to be the only topper we ever see from Hallmark.

2020 Storyteller Mirror Sulu QXI6071
2020 Storyteller Mirror Kirk QXI6061
2020 Storyteller Mirror Uhura QXI6074
2020 Storyteller Enterprise Tree Topper QXI6004

 

Star Trek: The Official Guide to The Animated Series

Star Trek: The Official Guide to The Animated Series was released September 3, 2019 and with it was a small mention of last year’s Arek and M’Ress ornaments. If you are a fan of The Animated Series then The Official Guide is a “must-have”!

Lieutenant Arex and Lieutenant M’Ress (QMP4046) were sold as a set of two with a retail of $40.00 at 2018 conventions. They had a limited run of 2800.

Mission Log – A Roddenberry Star Trek Podcast with Kevin Dilmore

Say hello to Star Trek novelist and the guy behind some of your favorite Trek Keepsake ornaments… it’s Kevin Dilmore! You may find a bigger geek, but you’d have to look hard. Topics include Star Trek: The Animated Series, hanging a sick sense of humor on a Christmas tree, and H.R. Pufnstuf.

Mission Log – A Roddenberry Star Trek Podcast

Kevin’s interview begins at 12:00.
Hallmark Star Trek ornament discussion begins at 36:00.

Kevin Dilmore and the History of Hallmark’s Star Trek Keepsake Ornaments Podcast

Kevin Dilmore and the history of Hallmark’s Star Trek Keepsake Ornaments

Steve and Kevin chat with Kevin Dilmore about his career as a journalist writing for the Star Trek Communicator magazine Star Trek short stories and novels and the Hallmark Keepsake Ornaments catalogue.
Kevin’s history at Hallmark begins at 11:30.
Hallmark’s Star Trek ornament discussion begins at 13:50.


Kevin Dilmore was a newspaper reporter and long-time contributing writer to Star Trek Communicator Magazine before breaking into fiction writing. In addition to novels and short stories, both solo and with writing partner Dayton Ward, Kevin also contributed the author interviews in 2003’s “Star Trek: Signature Collection” releases.

Hallmark Star Trek Ornaments in Vegas – August 3, 2019

INSIDE TREK – Is There In Truth No Keepsakes? Hallmark and Star Trek

Star Trek Las Vegas 2019, CBS All Access Stage

Saturday, August 3, 2019 – 10:45 am

Christine Taylor, Licensing Creative Manager, Hallmark

Kevin Dilmore, Senior Writer, Hallmark

Well, is there? How will you know for sure if you miss this panel? Join Hallmark Licensing Creative Manager Christine Taylor and Hallmark Senior Writer Kevin Dilmore for a tour through Hallmark’s 2019 Star Trek products, including Keepsake Ornaments, itty bittys® plush characters and event exclusives. Spoiler alert: 2020 will mark the 30th year of Star Trek Keepsake Ornaments—and you won’t believe how they are marking that anniversary. More spoilers: expect giveaways.

Complete Las Vegas 2019 schedule

August 3, 2018 – Friday, 11AM — “And the Keepsakes Shall Lead: Hallmark and Star Trek” – Star Trek Vegas Convention

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August 3, 2018 – Friday, 11AM — “And the Keepsakes Shall Lead: Hallmark and Star Trek”

Join Hallmark Licensing Creative Manager Christine Taylor and Hallmark Senior Writer Kevin Dilmore for a tour through Hallmark’s 2018 Star Trek products, including Keepsake Ornaments, itty bittys® plush characters and event exclusives. Don’t be surprised if a few sneak peeks and surprises from Hallmark’s plans for 2019 show up as well.

Kevin Dilmore’s Ornament Previews

Kevin Dilmore
Ever since his mom taught him to read at age 2, Kevin has loved to figure out how stories work so he could make up his own to tell-usually ones with spaceships, aliens and weird science stuff. In his career, he has told stories with novels, children’s books, screenplays, newspaper articles and more, including Hallmark greeting cards and Keepsake Ornaments. Kevin grew up in central Kansas and graduated from the University of Kansas. He’s very happy to hear about your favorite stories or tell you about his.

Kevin Dilmore is a Kansas-based writer of many Star Trek novels and short stories, specifically in the Star Trek: Starfleet Corps of Engineers series. He often collaborates with Dayton Ward.

In 1997, he began writing for the Star Trek: Communicator. Before working there, he was a newspaper reporter and editor for almost fifteen years on a community newspaper in Kansas.

He is currently co-hosting PopMinded, an online pop-culture series rich in geek gifts, collectibles and holiday decor from your favorite TV shows, books, movies, comic books and more.

2016

Trekland’s 2016 Ornaments…

 

2015

Trekland’s 2015 Ornaments and 2016 Previews…

 

2014

Trekland’s 2014 Ornaments and 2015 Previews…

 

2012

Trekland’s 2012 Ornaments and 2013 Previews…

 

2010

2010 Ornaments…

1991 Hallmark Article from Washington Post

Source: latimes.com

Star Trek Ornament Hits the Stars: A replica of the Starship Enterprise is this year’s hottest Christmas tree bauble

December 19, 1991|ROXANNE ROBERTS | THE WASHINGTON POST

WASHINGTON — Pick one: This year’s fastest-selling Christmas ornament is (a) a porcelain angel, (b) a Merry Olde Santa, (c) a replica of the Starship Enterprise from “Star Trek” complete with tiny red and green blinking lights on the spaceship’s bridge.

Answer: Beam me up, Santa.

The good news, for the clever shoppers who snapped up the $20 Hallmark Keepsake Magic ornament when it came out this summer, is that it’s the bauble to have. The bad news, for all of us who missed yet another hot trend, is that it’s completely sold out.

“If we had 1,000 of them, I’m sure we could have sold them all,” says Bonnie Dunnells, manager of Elm Tree Hallmark in Herndon, Va. “It’s the Cabbage Patch doll of ornaments.”

Demand for the Starship is the greatest that Hallmark has ever had for any ornament, says spokeswoman Betsy Helgager. The company will not release production figures but the Enterprise, which premiered this summer at about 11,000 retailers, was quickly reissued this fall when Hallmark realized it had a phenomenon on its branches. Each store got about 50.

Who knew? There was a spaceship last year, another one of the Keepsake Magic ornaments (“Lights! Music! Motion!”), but it wasn’t a big seller. This year Hallmark was banking on the $20 “It’s a Wonderful Life” with blinking lights, the $40 “Santa Special” train with talking Santa, and the $25 “Kringle’s Bumper Cars” with lights and motion.

But it’s the limited-edition Star Trek ornament, five inches long, which plugs into a miniature-bulb socket on the tree, that’s causing calls from desperate customers across the country. Hallmark attributes the demand to the show’s 25th anniversary, the recently released “Star Trek VI” movie and the death of the series’s creator, Gene Roddenberry.

Ornament collector Kay Layton of Germantown, Md., has 17 cartons of Christmas decorations. Usually she waits until the day after Christmas to buy, when everything goes on sale. But she snapped up an Enterprise in September. “I’m not a Trekkie but something told me to grab it.”

Since the ornament went on display in August, stores have been inundated with requests. Most started waiting lists; after a while, they stopped taking names. On Oct. 1, when retailers were allowed to reorder the spaceship, Hallmark received more than $1 million in orders, said one representative. Most shipments were sold out the day they arrived. People are still calling, even offering extra money.

The display ornament at Tysons Hallmark Corner was stolen in August. One woman threw a tantrum when she discovered customers were limited to one ornament each.

Even Hallmark employees have had to scramble. One wanted three ornaments for family members, so she called relatives in three different states and asked them to buy it for her. Dunnells–to be fair about it–put her own name on the waiting list in September and finally got her little Enterprise last week.

“I really have no feeling for it at all,” she said. “It’s just that I’m sure it’s going to be worth a lot of money someday.”

 

Starloggers’ “The Greatest Star Trek Hallmark Ornaments”

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José Soto of Starloggers recently posted his ten best Star Trek ship ornaments and the ten best character/diorama ornaments.

“When it comes to ornaments, Star Wars may be the big thing given the abundance of Hallmark ornaments that are all over the stores now. However, Star Trek fans know all too well that their beloved franchise started the Hallmark ornament craze back in 1991 with the release of the original Enterprise ornament.” (more)

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Be sure to check out Starloggers and see which ornament tops the list.

1993 Hallmark Article from Strange New Worlds

Source: strangenewworlds.com

Strange New Worlds was a science fiction collectors magazine published from 1992 through 1994, providing original articles, interviews, and news for science fiction collectors. This is a reprint of an article from Strange New Worlds Issue 10 – Oct/Nov 1993.

The Star Fleet of Hallmark
by Kevin Stevens

In 1991 Hallmark Cards produced the first in a series of Star Trek Keepsake Ornaments in commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the television series. The Starship Enterprise ornament was unveiled in July 1991. The finely detailed ornament blinking red and green lights on the saucer section was a beautiful recreation of the classic starship.

By August, Hallmark found that demand for this particular ornament was overwhelming; it appealed both to collectors of Keepsake Ornaments as well as Star Trek fans and collectors. The Enterprise proved to be the most popular ornament made by Hallmark since the Keepsake Ornament line was introduced in 1973.

By October 1991, Hallmark made the unprecedented decision to go back into production with the Enterprise ornament. Still, by December these supplies of ornaments were also depleted. It immediately began climbing in value on the secondary market. By June 1992 collectible dealers were advertising the $20 ornament for anywhere from $50 to as high as $125. Prices would climb higher still.

In 1992, Hallmark, wishing to repeat its success with the Starship Enterprise, produced a second Keepsake Ornament: the Shuttlecraft Galileo. This lighted ornament included a voice chip featuring the voice of Mr. Spock. By pushing a button, collectors could hear Spock wishing all a happy holiday. Anticipating a repeat of the response to their Enterprise ornament, Hallmark produced the Galileo in greater numbers. Retailing for $24, this ornament was so available to retailers that demand never exceeded supply.

Fans and collectors bought the Galileo in quantity. Hallmark heavily advertised the ornaments in science fiction and Star Trek publications. This exposure, combined with the increased production numbers, meant that fans interested in obtaining the ornament were able to do so easily at retail prices. A year later, collectors can find the Shuttlecraft Galileo ornament for between $35 and $40.

However, because many more fans obtained the second ornament in the series, the demand grew to complete the set by finding the Enterprise ornament. Fans were now hungry for it. Prices for the Starship Enterprise ornament climbed to $175, eventually topping out at about $250. One dealer at a Los Angeles area Star Trek convention had priced the ornament at $400. Prices for this piece have since stabilized at about $200.

Although the Galileo ornament never achieved the collectibility status of the first ornament, a counter display promoting the ornament has become collectible. The display featured a plastic globe recreating a moon with the Galileo ornament orbiting above it. A button at the base of the display allowed shoppers to hear the greeting from Mr. Spock. This display, which included a cardboard back with advertising information about the ornament, has gone on to the secondary marketplace, with prices from $75 to $150.

For 1993, Hallmark has released the third in the series of Star Trek ornaments: the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701D from Star Trek: The Next Generation. As with the first Enterprise ornament, this keepsake piece features blinking lights. No voice chip is included.

Hallmark announced that it would scale back production for the 1993 ornament, making the newest ornament a more promising collectible than the Galileo. Early reports from Hallmark Gold Crown Stores (retailers for the ornaments) bear this out. Stores that began receiving the ornaments in August have been sent only half their anticipated orders, making demand high from collectors. Even those who pre-ordered have had to wait for back orders to be received.

It remains to be seen how production numbers for the new ornament will stack up as the holiday season approaches. During the holiday season, collectors should anticipate increased prices for the earlier ornaments. If the pattern established in 1992 holds true, prices may spike again, but should stabilize in the new year.

Regardless of the fluctuating prices and collector frenzy, these ornaments remain among the most beautiful, and highly collectible, Star Trek items produced in recent years.

Kevin Stevens is editor of Trek Collector, a bimonthly newsletter for Star Trek fans and collectors. He has been a Star Trek collector since 1972. His collection was featured recently on Los Angeles’ Fox TV news station KTTV. 

Back issues of Strange New Worlds available here.

1992 Hallmark Article from Strange New Worlds

Source: strangenewworlds.com

Strange New Worlds was a science fiction collectors magazine published from 1992 through 1994, providing original articles, interviews, and news for science fiction collectors. This is a reprint of an article from Strange New Worlds Issue 4 – Oct/Nov 1992.

Hallmark Ornament Update –
1992 Shuttlecraft Galileo Keepsake Ornament

 by Jo Davidsmeyer

Hallmark officially kicked-off its promotion of the new Shuttlecraft Galileo Keepsake ornament on August 29 [1992], though ornaments were available for sale in select stores the first week in August. This lighted ornament is based on the shuttlecraft design from the classic Star Trek TV series. It features a holiday message from Mr. Spock (voice provided by Leonard Nimoy).

As with all Hallmark Keepsake ornaments, it is unknown how many of these ornaments will be produced. This is proprietary information that Hallmark closely guards. However, it is assumed that based upon the phenomenally successful sales of last year’s Enterprise ornament, that Hallmark will be producing enough of these to meet the demand. The Leonard Nimoy commercial for the Galileo encourages buying multiples of the ornament.

At the 50th World SF Convention, dealers were already asking $50.00 for this ornament that is still available elsewhere for the original retail price of $24.00. Stocks of the Galileo ornament were quickly depleted by eager collectors and dealers in many stores. Before paying inflated dealer prices, first check with your local Hallmark store.

You might also see in your local shop the charming Galileo counter display. It features a large three-dimensional cardboard asteroid (replete with meteor crates) with the Galileo suspended in “orbit” above it. A button clearly marked “press here” is at the base of the display and allows the customer to hear Spock’s holiday message.

As reported in Issue #2 of Strange New Worlds [“Hallmark’s Voyage of the Starship Enterprise”], Hallmark had more demand for last year’s Enterprise ornament than for any other item made by Hallmark since Keepsake Ornaments were first begun in 1973. It is still too early to judge if this latest addition to Hallmark’s Starfleet will enjoy equal attention. Hallmark collectors currently list the value of the 1991 Enterprise (original retail value of $20.00) at $175.00.

Back issues of Strange New Worlds available here.

82) 2017 U.S.S. Franklin

STAR TREK BEYOND™ U.S.S. Franklin™ Ornament With Light
Regular price $32.95

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
Discovered half-buried on an alien world more than a century after its launch from Earth, the U.S.S. Franklin proved its worth to Captain Kirk and the stranded crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise in 2016’s STAR TREK BEYOND™. This Christmas ornament brings the ship to life with handcrafted detailing and lighting effect. Battery-operated light feature includes three replaceable LR41 batteries. Learn more about Keepsake Ornaments.
Christmas tree ornament.
Magic Light.
Press button to see the ship light up.
Dated 2017 in copyright.
Battery operated. Three (3) LR41 batteries included.
Pre-packaged for easy gift-giving, preservation and storage.
3.5″ W x 1.1″ H x 5.15″ D

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Hallmark’s 2017 U.S.S. Franklin ornament was announced on August 4, 2017 at Star Trek Las Vegas by artist Kevin Dilmore.

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imageConcept art poster of U.S.S. Franklin for Star Trek Beyond motion picture.

STARTREK.COM Presents “Iconic Ornaments” August 4, 2016

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August 3rd – 7th, 2016 in Las Vegas

August 4, 2016 – 12:00pm STARTREK.COM PRESENTS…ICONIC ORNAMENTS
Hallmark invites fans to take a journey into Christmas pasts and revisit some of the most iconic Keepsake Ornaments. First introduced in 1991, Hallmark’s iconic Star Trek ornaments celebrate their 25th anniversary this year. Join legendary Hallmark ship ornament sculptor Lynn Norton as well as Hallmark’s Christine Taylor and Kevin Dilmore as they share insight on the selection of process, the creation as well as the success of these annual fan favorites.

See the entire convention schedule here…http://www.creationent.com/cal/st_lasvegas_sch.html

“The Star Trek Las Vegas Convention, celebrating 50 years of Gene Roddenberry’s legacy, is going to be an unprecedented 5 day event!!! It is sure to be the biggest Trek celebration in all the galaxy. We are completely sold out but we wanted all Trekkers to be able to follow along with this milestone event. Here is your one stop shop for all of the #STLV50 social media posts. Follow along with updates and photos from Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest all in one convenient streaming location! http://stlv.worldsecuresystems.com/tablet/index.html”

25th Anniversary Revisit: 1991 U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701

It has been 25 years since Star Trek’s Enterprise debuted as a Hallmark Keepsake Ornament.  Over that quarter of a century it has been followed by nearly eighty more ornaments depicting ships, characters and scenes from all five television shows and three movies series. We have Lynn Norton to thank for sculpting all of the ship ornaments but 1992’s Galileo.

Lynn Norton did a 2015 interview with Kevin Dilmore of startrek.com: “At Hallmark, Don Palmiter, Dill Rhodus and I brought fine scale model-making to the ornament business. We really had to convince our art directors we could go beyond cute and traditional and make really believable small models to be used as ornaments. Our commitment to high quality fit right into the Hallmark ideals for product. Now, I also had to fight the initial idea of having a string of garland hanging along the edge of the primary hull, and Santa Claus popping out of the bridge — true story! I wanted to make it as accurate as possible. I’m very aware of the changes to that first ornament. Because it had big, thick circuitry inside for lights, the ornament had heat dissipation problems. We had to build a big cavity into it so the circuit board would not melt the plastic. Also, the ornament had to fit into a ‘printer’s box’ store display with a limited space, and I had to shorten the nacelles for it to fit. I beat that poor design nearly to death, but it got us started and it was very popular with fans of Star Trek and of Keepsake Ornaments. When we reissued the ornament in 1996 for the show’s 30th anniversary, we used the same design.”
– See more at: http://www.startrek.com/article/hallmark-sculptor-lynn-norton-on-the-storied-history-of-trek-keepsake-ornaments#sthash.EKFFnHTi.dpuf

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32) 2003 The Scorpion – Star Trek Nemesis

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Abducted and imprisoned on a hostile aliean starship, Captain Jean-Luc Picard is freed by Commander Data in disguise.  Together they battle their way through the corridors of the huge vessel into a shuttle bay, where they discover a fleet of Scorpion attack flyers.

Unable to open the shuttle doors, their only means of escape is for Captain Picard to pilot a Scorpion through the twisting interioir of the ship to freedom.

This Keepsake Ornament features glowing lights on the Scorpion’s wing panels ans exhaust port as well as in the landing lights.  The cockpit instrument panel is also lighted. Sculpted by Hallmark Keepsake Artists Lynn norton and Anita Marra Rogers.

2003

QXI7509

Plug in

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The Scorpion ornament was sculpted by Lynn Norton but the Data and Picard figures within were sculpted by Anita Marra Rogers. Rogers sculpted a majority of Star Trek ornaments that were not starships and generally focused on figures.

All promotional photos of the Scorpion are shown with a clear canopy and characters are easily seen. Final production of the Scorpion included a tinted canopy mostly obscuring the characters inside.

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“Look closely beyond the smoked canopy of the Scorpion ornament, and you may discern painted figures of Captain Picard and Data in the cockpit as sculpted by Keepsake Artist Anita Marra Rogers. Original designs for the ornament included a transparent canopy transparent on the ornament, but changed to match the studio model used for filming. The change came too late to alter photographs on the ornament’s retail box and other Hallmark publications, which clearly show the figures.” -Kevin Dilmore

Read more here.